Fiona Loudain

 

Character: Fiona Loudain

Appearance/Personality: A real head-turning beauty but ill at ease with some of the negative attention it brings, thinking it undermines her accomplishments. She is a sweet Southern girl, down-to-earth, athletic, assertive, and scrappier than her appearance lets on. Her style is generally understated but put together. She has a lean, tone build, which she works diligently to maintain, flowing honey-blond curls, gently sun-kissed skin, gem-cut blue eyes, and a delicate neck that looks like it was made to be draped in diamonds. Too bad it never is.

Fear: The sight of blood makes her anxious, nauseous, and afraid. She has no explanation for this aversion. There doesn’t appear to be any childhood trauma or a specific source of the fear. It’s a complicated fear, however, for a woman who bleeds monthly, and it’s something that may make being a police officer more difficult. But she’s determined to do her job anyway.

The Weir Family: Growing up, Fiona’s family rarely had much money. Though the Weir family was middle class, they struggled to make ends meet after taking on the burden of raising several other children when Fiona’s aunt and uncle were killed in a car crash. The children had no other family to turn to and rather than let them enter into the system, Fiona’s parents took them in, but this put a strain on their finances and relationship. However, the Weirs managed to scrape by with the help of their neighbors, church, and community. This instilled a strong sense of community in Fiona early on and a desire to protect the town and to give back to the other families. Her father, Brody Weir, works as one of the groundskeepers for the Biltmore Estate, and her mother, Jennyfer Weir, was a high school English teacher, who became embroiled in a scandal after having sex with one of her students, one Fiona knew. She harbors a lot of anger toward her mother over this vile incident, and some residual hostility toward the student in question too, feeling a sense of shame and betrayal over the whole ordeal.

Teenage Years – An All-Around American Girl: Fiona was popular, approachable, outgoing, and clique-defying. She was particularly drawn to sports, martial arts, and debate. She was also involved with several after school clubs, one focusing on hiking, rock climbing, another in ballroom dancing. She met the mentor who would change her life and inspire her to become a police officer while pursuing these activities. Detective Liam Talbot arranged for an internship for Fiona with the Sheriff’s office when she was in college. Sadly, Liam was later killed in the line of duty during a heist gone wrong. The case was closed, but the circumstances of his death have always seemed a little fishy to her. And she means to dig a little deeper. Fiona made note that one of the local burnouts she went to high school with was there during the crime, a victim on the scene, who had gotten half of his hand blown off. She’s not entirely convinced Jimbo’s story adds up.

Miss Blue Ridge, a Contested Crown Kept: Fiona’s family didn’t have much to spare for college, but Fiona was determined to finance her own way into criminal justice. She was awarded an athletic scholarship and won the crown as Miss Blue Ridge. However, this became complicated when she got pregnant as a teenager with her son Aeden. She was not able to start college when she anticipated and lost her athletic scholarship. And the Miss Blue Ridge pageant tried vehemently to take away her crown with the scandal of a teen mom besmirching their pageant. She used her debate skills and pressed them on this matter, and took them to court, and they eventually recanted, allowing her to keep the crown and the scholarship rather than promote the image that teen mothers were ultimately not beautiful. Some looked to Fiona as an inspiration. However, some felt her actions were self-aggrandizing and that she was glamorizing teen pregnancy. Her time crowned as Miss Blue Ridge is over, and it is now more of an interesting anecdote, if slightly controversial.

A Troubled Marriage, Michael Loudain: Fiona quickly ended up marrying her high school sweetheart, Michael. Most assume he’s Aedan’s father, but this may or may not necessarily be true. Michael joined the military and was never the same after an incident that occurred during his time of service. He wouldn’t discuss what happened with Fiona, but became prone to violent and suicidal moods, and was diagnosed with PTSD. He was given a prescription to help ease his condition. However, he became addicted to the pills and seemed to rely on them more and more. During his violent outbreaks, he would sometimes abuse Fiona, but then feel remorse about it later. Fiona was able to defend herself to a degree, but this often simply masked the secret problem. And there is no true defense from seeing someone you love turn on you, never knowing if you’ll get Dr. Jeckyl or Mr. Hyde. She told herself it was just the PTSD, the pills, because he never once laid a hand on her outside of an episode. And he never touched their son, Aeden. Michael was also filled with self-loathing during his lucid moments about what he had done, apologetic, and attentive. It all confused Fiona and made her feel isolated.

It was a huge irony, that Fiona who had joined the police academy to protect and serve the community, was unable to fully protect herself and felt increasingly helpless to save her spiraling marriage. But she wasn’t about to give up, and Fiona was finally able to talk Michael into joining a rehab program. Michael was significantly better when he returned home, and things were looking up for them.

Death of a Child: One afternoon while Aeden was climbing an ancient oak tree, he fell from it. He seemed a little bruised and shaken, but after awhile seemed fine. Fiona didn’t think anything about it when Aeden settled in for a nap later. This mistake would prove deadly. Aeden never woke up, likely from suffering a concussion after hitting the ground. Some of the more fanciful folk around town whispered instead that it was the work of the spirits who watched by the old oaks. Just the superstition of a small town, of course. It was certainly an accident, but Fiona blamed herself for Aeden’s death. Her husband Michael also blamed her. And he succumbed to his addiction again.

Present Day: Some time has passed but the grief remains as does the pain, and the relationship with Fiona and Michael is strained. Now a rookie police officer, Fiona often uses her work to try to limit her interaction with Michael, sometimes lingering at the Esse Eck’s Club. She can hear the voices now and then in the crowd about the scandalous teen mother who murdered her child later mixed with the lustful musings of creeps, and softer words from those who pity her, and strained words or no words at all, just a look, from those who need help, who feel as isolated as some part of her does in their troubles.